With many dependency injection frameworks, your XML mapping files can quickly grow large and difficult to navigate. With Ninject, your type bindings are collected into groups called modules. Each of these modules represents an independent segment of your application. They can be organized however you like. Modules just need to implement the IModule interface, but most should extend the StandardModule class for simplicity. Here's an example:

C#:
class WarriorModule : StandardModule {
  public override Load() {
    Bind<IWeapon>().To<Sword>();
    Bind<Samurai>().ToSelf();
  }
}

VB.NET:
Public Class WarriorModule
  Inherits StandardModule

  Public Overrides Sub Load()
      Bind(Of IWeapon).To(Of Sword)()
      Bind(Of Samurai).ToSelf()
  End Sub
End Class

Once you create modules, you load them into a container called the kernel. As the name suggests, the kernel is the core of your application. To request an instance of a type from Ninject, you call the kernel's Get() method.

This example illustrates how to create a kernel, and activate and use an instance of the Samurai type:

C#:
class Program {
  public static void Main() {
    IKernel kernel = new StandardKernel(new WarriorModule());
    Samurai warrior = kernel.Get<Samurai>();
    warrior.Attack("the evildoers");
  }
}

VB.NET:
Module Module1
  Sub Main()
    Dim kernel As IKernel = New StandardKernel(New WarriorModule())
    Dim warrior As Samurai = kernel.Get(Of Samurai)()
    warrior.Attack("evil doers")
  End Sub
End Module

After Ninject works its magic, the result of the call to Get() is a Samurai armed with a Sword. Therefore, the call to the Samurai's Attack() method results in the same output that we saw earlier: Chopped the evildoers clean in half. More information about the full process Ninject follows when Get() is called is described in The Activation Process.

You can create as many modules as you'd like, and pass them all to the kernel's constructor:

C#:
class Module1 {
  public void Load() { ... }
}

class Module2 {
  public void Load() { ... }
}

class Program {
  public static void Main() {
    IKernel kernel = new StandardKernel(new Module1(), new Module2(), ...);
    ...
  }
}

VB.NET:
Public Class Module1
   Public Sub Load()
      ... 
   End Sub 
 End Class 
 Public Class Module2
   Public Sub Load()
      ...
   End Sub
 End Class
Module Program1
  Sub Main()
    Dim kernel As IKernel = new StandardKernel(New Module1(), New Module2(), ...) 
  End Sub 
End Module 

Also, keep in mind that modules are executed just like any other code in your application. Nothing says they're limited to a boring, static collection of bindings. You can always do more creative things like this:

C#:
class WeaponsModule {
  private readonly bool _useMeleeWeapons;

  public WeaponsModule(bool useMeleeWeapons) {
    _useMeleeWeapons = useMeleeWeapons;
  }

  public void Load() {
    if (useMeleeWeapons)
      Bind<IWeapon>().To<Sword>();
    else
      Bind<IWeapon>().To<Shuriken>();
  }
}

class Program {
  public static void Main() {
    bool useMeleeWeapons = false;
    IKernel kernel = new StandardKernel(new WeaponsModule(useMeleeWeapons));
    Samurai warrior = kernel.Get<Samurai>();
    warrior.Attack("the evildoers");
  }
}

VB.NET:
Public Class WeaponsModule
  Inherits StandardModule
  Private ReadOnly _useMeleeWeapons As Boolean
  Public Sub New(ByVal useMeleeWeapons As Boolean)
    _useMeleeWeapons = useMeleeWeapons
  End Sub
  Public Overrides Sub Load()
    If (_useMeleeWeapons) Then
      Bind(Of IWeapon).To(Of Sword)()
    Else
      Bind(Of IWeapon).To(Of Sword)()
    End If
  End Sub
End Class

Module Module2
  Dim useMeleeWeapons As Boolean = False
  Dim kernel As IKernel = New StandardKernel(New WeaponsModule(useMeleeWeapons))
  Dim warrior As Samurai = kernel.Get(Of Samurai)()
  warrior.Attack("the evildoers")
End Module

This will result in our Samurai being armed with a Shuriken, causing the output Pierced the evildoers armor. If you set the useMeleeWeapons flag to true, the binding would be from IWeapon to Sword, resulting in the output Chopped the evildoers clean in half. Many more advanced scenarios are possible, including reading configuration files, command-line arguments, and the like. And we still haven't even talked about contextual bindings! :)

Continue reading: Providers and the Activation Context

Last edited Sep 13, 2009 at 2:28 AM by nkohari, version 1

Comments

Zapbbx Jan 22 at 2:59 AM 
Bind<SomeInterface>().To<SomeConcreteTypeThatImplementsIt>();

loopdebugger Jan 24, 2013 at 5:09 PM 
Bind<IWeapon>().To<Sword>();
I need "Bind" example please